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Each week, I try to answer generic questions from readers. Here is this week's edition. You can use the form below to ask your questions. Yesterday's post on Five Books That Will Redefine Your Understanding of Stock Markets was interrupted by server maintenance that went on for four hours too long. So do check that out.

The writing for Gamechanger, my new book with Pranav Surya is over. We are both excited about the way it has turned out, and currently editing it and waiting for the ISBN number. This will be an out and out DIY undertaking, thanks to Pranav who is doing everything possible to keep the book cost as low as possible. Watch this space for more developments.

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2

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Here are five unique books that will will completely change the way you think about stock market risk and reward. They have certainly shaped mine and my first ever financial calculator was based on one of them. The books will bust established myths about the market - its so-called efficiency, mean reversion, and the way we measure risk and reward - not with opinions, but with data.

1 Unveiling The Retirement Myth - Jim Otar

Tag line: Advanced Retirement Planning Based On Market History

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5

Anirban Ghosh had posted his analysis of a debt mutual fund at Facebook Group, Asan Ideas for Wealth (AIFW). When I requested him to write an account of how he selected his first debt mutual fund, he readily agreed.  Anirban's data crunching has unearthed an interesting mutual fund with a curious strategy and is the main reason for my request.

Before we begin, I would like to point out that,

1: the debt mutual funds mentioned in the post should not be treated as recommendations.

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4

A few days ago, I had published the 13th edition of the freefincal stock analyser that auto-generates Hewitt Heiserman Jr.'s Earnings Power Box, thanks to the efforts of Rs. Srivatsan, who explained how to identify good business from bad one using it in a guest post: It’s Earnings That Count: Forget the next Infy; Can you identify the next Satyam? This is an update to that sheet after correcting a couple of issues.

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6

I am often asked this question. The catching up here refers to being able to create an adequate retirement corpus. The answer depends on the age of the person. For someone in the 30s (even late 30s), I think it is quite possible if they put their head down and invest enough for the next 15 years. This is part two of the Ugly Truth: How much should I invest for retirement?

Fifteen years is a lifetime when it comes to investing and with some luck and discipline, even a 40-year-old can make enough corpus to retire by 55 or so. Even by age 40, an exposure to 60% equity need not be risky. So it is not late at all. Only above age 45, the risk becomes too high even if the person has the appetite for it.

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