Have You Ever Taken a Chance in Life?

I am a fan of actor Kevin Costner. I think  he has taken pretty big career risks,pulled off some and failed in some, but has always stuck to his guns, which is admirable. He has even declared that if his stardom vanishes overnight, he can make a decent living with a blue collar job, because he is skilled.

I saw an YouTube interview yesterday in which he mentioned that, his father regretted never having taken a chance in life and having been in the same job all his life. Costner had to reassure him that he had been a good father who provided all he could for his family.

That  set me thinking about my own life. Regular readers would be well aware that as an investor, I am pessimistic, cautious, and always keen to contain downside risk. It might surprise them, (as it did me!), that when it came to my career, I had repeatedly taken chances. Some driven by my heart- a refusal to do something that I don't like, some was driven by my stupid self-belief.

I once gave up a lucrative contract in Germany because I felt home-sick. One part of me said I was committing career suicide (as did my mentors and many of my friends) and one part of me said, I can work in peace only when I happy.

After coming back home, I worked without pay for 4 months, when my employer took pity and created a makeshift position for me.

For the next 6-8 months, I did not look for any other job but put all my cards on a single job which I was desperate to get as it was the only one that appealed to me.

I got the job and completely changed my area of research. This is again considered professional suicide as it will take at least a couple of years to get published.

Though I was doing quite well, nearly two years later, positions for my dream job -one that involved teaching - was open.

There was fierce pressure from my current employer to prevent me from taking the interview. My father was fighting cancer and I was confined to the hospital taking care of him. I prepared for the interview from there.

Things got to such a point that there was the serious danger of losing both jobs - my current one and my dream job. My father urged me to take the chance. He said he believed in me and asked me to go for it.

The gamble paid off. I got the position but I went ahead and committed career suicide once again(!) by choosing to work in another entirely different research area.

While I did quite well on the teaching front, research was riddled with stumbling blocks.  Thanks to some hard-working and spirited students, I was able to set up a decent laboratory.

After nearly a decade of doing this, I think I am all set to commit professional suicide once again! (Sorry can't say more).

As mentioned above, some of the chances that I took was driven by my heart, and some by ridiculous self-belief that I could pull it off. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it did not. In hindsight, considering my current circumstances, I am glad that I took those chances. Well, at least some of them!

have you ever taken a chance
Photo Credit: Jennifer (flickr)

 

Point of this rant

If you had a chance to take up a job that you truly love, will you take a chance and make an all-out effort to grab it? Even if it meant risking a cushy salary and perhaps your career in a particular area? Will you quit your well-paying job to become an entrepreneur?

I would probably vote, yes, but we will have to accept the consequences without too much regret.

Wealth creation or financial security has two components to it: Income and investing.

Investing is independent of how we earn an income. There are those who have taken some big chances with investing. I dont have the stomach for that. Perhaps because I am always doing stupid things to my "career".

Income is a different ball game. We could earn from a job we truly love (in which case we wont worry about how much we make) or we could earn from a job we truly hate (in which case, all we care about is how much we make).

Sometimes the time window in which we could shift from a job we hate, to a job we love could be quite tight and narrow.

Sometimes we will have to take a chance in life to achieve lasting change and happiness.  Sometimes we will have to roll the dice and see how it pans out.

The regret of never having taken a chance could be greater than the consequences of having taken one.

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40 thoughts on “Have You Ever Taken a Chance in Life?

  1. Rajanikant Gajjar

    You may do whatever you feel OK with your income part that is CAREER,but do not change your -pessimistic, cautious, and always keen to contain downside risk.- APPROACH.Because that is the RIGHT approach which creates SOLID foundation for you to do what you feel OK with your CAREER-INCOME part.
    Wish you all, all the best

    Reply
  2. Rajanikant Gajjar

    You may do whatever you feel OK with your income part that is CAREER,but do not change your -pessimistic, cautious, and always keen to contain downside risk.- APPROACH.Because that is the RIGHT approach which creates SOLID foundation for you to do what you feel OK with your CAREER-INCOME part.
    Wish you all, all the best

    Reply
  3. Shan

    Good luck Pattu. Steve Jobs — 'Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.'

    Reply
  4. Shan

    Good luck Pattu. Steve Jobs — 'Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.'

    Reply
  5. moronbuffett

    yes, taken those risks, followed the heart when head suggested the opposite, failed miserably in career + $ + life, still had a joy ride during that experience, got back up but was painful and took a while.

    " Do not let your school interfere with your education" - Mark Twain

    "Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking" - Steve Jobs

    Reply
  6. moronbuffett

    yes, taken those risks, followed the heart when head suggested the opposite, failed miserably in career + $ + life, still had a joy ride during that experience, got back up but was painful and took a while.

    " Do not let your school interfere with your education" - Mark Twain

    "Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking" - Steve Jobs

    Reply
  7. Navneet Kumar

    Pattabiraman Murari Sir, whatever you will do, I am sure it will have a positive effect on many people's financial lives as you are a maths expert and tend to do complete mathematical analysis of any aspect of finance.

    Reply

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